Resolving a issue with your Airbnb guest

For the first time since becoming a Airbnb host more than a year ago i've had to use the Airbnb Resolution Centre. I was impressed with the results but perhaps my case was an easy one fortunately I haven't had any serious problems being an Airbnb host.   Screen Shot 2016-04-29 at 20.28.12   I raised a Airbnb Resolution Centre case because a guest had booked the room for one person but sneaked his girlfriend in to sleep the night. He checked in by himself but at some point during the night while I was sleeping very quietly brought his girlfriend home. It was almost certainly pre planned and I would never have known about it but they made no effort to hide it the next day.   [caption id="attachment_279" align="aligncenter" width="372"]Use the Airbnb Resolution centre if you have a problem Use the Airbnb Resolution centre if you have a problem with a guest.[/caption]

Continue Reading

How much should I increase my Airbnb prices during the summer?

Spring is in the air in London and I'm fully booked. I occasionally raise my prices on days where I would prefer to not be full (to give myself a bit of a break) but even these slots were booked up. After 3 months of cold weather and horrible rain it looks like the weather in London is about to improve. Better weather usually mean more guests so it could be very busy over the next six months.

How much should I increase my prices during the summer?

Although I do increase my prices during the summer it's not by much. Only a few extra pounds per night. Part of the reason is that I don't want disappointed customers who rate my listing less than five starts for value. If I put my price high then there is a certain expectation to live up to that price. A lower price has much less expectation - "at least it was cheap."   [caption id="attachment_269" align="aligncenter" width="511"]Make your price correct as guests will rate you on value for money Make your price correct as guests will rate you on value for money[/caption]   I did notice this on my listing for the first time. "This is a rare find - Richard's place is usually booked." Being a 'rare find' must be some sort of special Airbnb host badge. It does at least create this extra impetus to buy for potential guests - If Richard is usually booked then he must be good. I have no idea what it takes to become a rare find but I have had over 300 guests and I'm usually full so maybe thats it.   Screen Shot 2016-04-03 at 16.03.01   My strategy is simple - stay booked all the time. If I have to lower my price I will. The way I see it Airbnb wants good hosts who will take bookings at any time. If your a reliable host they will reward you with more business (hopefully). Being too choosey on what price your willing to take and which type of guests your happy to accept will reduce your future bookings.   [caption id="attachment_274" align="aligncenter" width="299"]Guests putting you on your wish list helps your rankings Guests putting you on your wish list helps your rankings[/caption]   The more guests you've had the more guests you will have. It's all about being a safe bet. Most of your guests will be from out of town and will not know your area and will judge on your pictures firstly and secondly on your reviews. A good looking picture helps a lot but it's the reviews that make the sale. A long list of great reviews will put someone at ease and be confident they are getting what they see in the picture. To get those reviews you need lots and lots of bookings which means taking almost anyone who wants to stay and at the times when it doesn't always suit you. Thats business.